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Sponsored by National Science Foundation’s Expeditions in Computing Program

(Awards #1522074 / 1521925 / 1521759).

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Protein Engineering Diagrams

February 10, 2017

Diagram for a two-protein design that provides light-inducible programmed localization to the cell membrane.

 

We've got a new paper that's just been accepted, working toward extending the SBOL visual diagram language to be able to describe the engineering of proteins as well as DNA and RNA.  The core driving force behind this effort has been Sid Cox, who's done a good bit of work in the area and has had the courage to make this first surely-imperfect proposal, with a number of others of us helping critique, refine, and bend things towards compatibility and integration.


The idea behind the language is surprisingly simple: despite the ferocious complexity of how proteins fold and interact, when we engineer with proteins our actions can often be described much more simply. Proteins, particularly in complex eukaryotic organisms, are often quite modular, with specific domains controlling things like where they go in a cell, what they interact with, and how they decay. These are, in turn, laid out along an initial single line of amino acids (and encoded in DNA or RNA), and can often be recombined by mixing and matching these components. Doing that isn't simple, but explaining what you have done and why often can be fairly simple.

 

Read Beal's full blog post here.

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